Consuming Desires

Family Crisis and the State in the Middle East

Frances S. Hasso

Over the course of the twentieth century, most Middle East states adopted a shari’a-based system for recognizing marriages. Partly in reaction to th

English edition
272 pp.
15X23cm
ISBN 9789774164736
For sale only in the Middle East

16.95

Over the course of the twentieth century, most Middle East states adopted a shari’a-based system for recognizing marriages. Partly in reaction to these dynamics, new types of marriage that evade the control of the state and religious authorities have emerged. These marriages allow for men and women to engage in sexual relationships, but do not require that they register the marriage with the state, that they live together, or that the man be financially responsible for the wife or household. In this new study, Frances Hasso explores the extent to which these new relationship forms are used and to what ends, as well as the legal and cultural responses to such innovations. She outlines what is at stake for the various groups—the state, religious leaders, opposition groups, young people, men and women of different classes and locations, and feminist organizations—in arguments for and against these relationship forms.

Frances S. Hasso

Frances S. Hasso is associate professor of sociology at Oberlin College and visiting associate professor at Duke University.
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