Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt

An Environmental History

Alan Mikhail

Based on both the local records of various towns and villages in rural Egypt and the imperial orders of the Ottoman state, this book charts how change

English edition
378 pp.
9 maps7 bw
15X23cm
ISBN 9789774165542
For sale only in the Middle East

$39.95

Based on both the local records of various towns and villages in rural Egypt and the imperial orders of the Ottoman state, this book charts how changes in the control of natural resources fundamentally altered the nature of Ottoman imperial sovereignty in Egypt and throughout the empire. In revealing how Egyptian peasants were able to use their knowledge and experience of local environments to force the hand of the imperial state, Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt tells a story of the connections of the empire stretching from canals in the Egyptian countryside to the palace in Istanbul, from the Anatolian forest to the shores of the Red Sea, and from a plague flea’s bite to the fortunes of one of the most powerful states of the early modern world.

Alan Mikhail

Alan Mikhail is assistant professor of history at Yale University. Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt won the 2009–11 Roger Owen Book Award from the Middle East Studies Association and the 2011 Samuel and Ronnie Heyman Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Publication from Yale University. Professor Mikhail’s article in the International Journal of Middle East Studies won the 2009–11 Ömer Lütfi Barkan Article Prize from the Turkish Studies Association. He writes for the Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, History Compass, the Bulletin of the History of Medicine, Akhbar al-adab, and Wijhat naẓar.
Menu

Cart